Reducing credit hours?

Alyssa mcCauley, Staff writer

Recently a discussion has been going around about possibly decreasing the number of credits required in order to graduate with a general associate’s degree. An associate’s degree typically consists of 64-credit-hours in different categories such as life science, math, fine arts, social science, global appreciation, and health.

When Deborah Anderson, vice president for academic affairs, was asked about IVCC’s standing she said, “I am not sure this is as much of a proposal as something that is one the radar screen and may become necessary at some time in the future.

“Currently, new programs that are submitted to the state for approval are recommended to be no more than 60 credits,” she continued. “Proposals for programs that are more than 60 credits must also submit a justification for the additional credits. As always the state has final approval authority for new programs.”

By decreasing the number of credits in an associate’s degree students will be able to go on to desired fields more quickly. The downfall to cutting credits from an associate’s degree is that the state will have to make a decision on what classes are not necessary for students.

According to Renee Prine, a counselor at IVCC, “Each class that a student completes will stay with them on a transcript for life. This is beneficial to students because earning an associate’s degree can be accomplished at each student’s own pace.”

If a cut is made, “students who attended college in a program prior to the change will not be affected” says Prine.

Prine also discussed the beneficial programs available by IVCC online to help considering students understand the outcomes of going to college. IVCC offers a program called “Career Cruising,” which helps students find their interests and better view their options. This program is informative about local jobs in the area, the amounts of money a job will pay and the possibilities for students who earn certain degrees.

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