New meets old: CTC welcomes sundial sculpture

A crane lifts the final piece of the sundial sculpture, which fit together much like a puzzle, on Dec. 19. The artwork was shipped in separate parts to ensure for safer transportation.
A crane lifts the final piece of the sundial sculpture, which fit together much like a puzzle, on Dec. 19. The artwork was shipped in separate parts to ensure for safer transportation.
A worker climbs to remove the crane straps off of the final piece of sculpture which will complete the sundial which stands 14 feet tall in front of the CTC building.
A worker climbs to remove the crane straps off of the final piece of sculpture which will complete the sundial which stands 14 feet tall in front of the CTC building.As most were eager to leave campus and begin winter break, IVCC embraced the arrival of a sundial sculpture on Dec. 19, 2014, positioned outside of the secondary entrance to the Community Technology Center

As most were eager to leave campus and begin winter break, IVCC embraced the arrival of a sundial sculpture on Dec. 19, 2014, positioned outside of the secondary entrance to the Community Technology Center.

This sundial sculpture was designed and constructed by John Adduci, an Illinois artist from Wicker Park. Entitled “Power On,” the sculpture is just one of many of Adduci’s signature stainless steel pieces. His Web site www.johnadduci.com describes him as “an internationally recognized artist utilizing the fluidity of metal to express both movement and stability to outdoor sculpture.”

IVCC President Jerry Corcoran served as part of the college’s committee to determine which type of artwork should be selected. The committee directed the Capital Development Board (CDB) to solicit proposals for a three-dimensional landmark, specific to the space available at the southeast entrance to the CTC building.

Corcoran explained why such an ancient representation of technology was chosen to enhance a modern setting: “The sculptor did a fabulous job of connecting the past with the future by creating a sundial which also appears to represent the universal on-and-off switch for so much of today’s technology.”

Other members of the original decision committee included Paul Basalay, Dennis Thompson, Lori Scroggs, David Bergsieker, Rick Pearce, and Cheryl Roelfsema.

The art-in-architecture budget of $114,224, 0.5 percent of the approved state funds set aside for construction by the CDB, is directed towards the commissioning of artwork to enhance the culture of the newly constructed addition to campus.

After 37 artist proposals were narrowed down to four, the sculpture was directly voted upon by the State of Illinois Fine Art Review Committee, including members Jerry Hicks, La Salle County; Robert Eschbach, La Salle County; Lee McCullough, City of Oglesby; Jodie Kavensky, Illinois Arts Council; Jim Zimmer, Illinois State Museum; and Michael Alstadt, Basalay, Carey & Alstadt Architects.

Standing at 14 feet at its highest point, the sundial’s reflective stainless steel composition catches the eye of passing students, its large body encompassing both the functionality and natural beauty of sunlight during the day. Passerby may also admire the sculpture after sunset, with the installation of lights in its concrete base by local company Ficek Electric.

“I’m thrilled with it,” said Fran Brolley, director of community relations and development, when asked for his opinion on the sculpture. “I think it’s beautiful, and I hope everyone feels the same way.”

As for more artwork in the future, Brolley knows of no plans in direct correlation with construction; however, he theorized that the large lobby area in the CTC building entrance may be the next site evaluated for art additions.

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