Presentation addresses bullying

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Lexie Abbott

Students get up and active for an Education Psych presentation on bullying in instructor Jill Urban-Bollis’ class.

Lexie Abbott, IV Leader Staff

In an Educational Psych presentation, Christian Honn, Kayla Casey and Yvette Lucas made it known that bullying is no laughing matter.

Whether you’re the one on the issuing or the receiving end, it can affect anyone and everyone involved. It is sad to say that most bullying happens at school.

While teachers can do their part by addressing bullying when it happens, the most influence can come from students.

The presentation emphasized how the severity of the situation could not be more prominent, yet society has numbingly accepted it as just another precursor of adolescent life. It was made clear that the reality of the matter is that damage a bully does to a victim is irreversible and permanent, affecting the decisions they make for the rest of their life.

Honn, Casey, and Lucas also manage to convey the fact that some bullies become that way because their home life is a constant battle.

An original rap song entitled “Listen,” written by Honn, was turned into a music video with the help of Casey and Lucas to help the class visualize their point.

The song demonstrates that listening to the problem at hand can help resolve issues in order for the bully and the victim to reconcile.

In the video, a young boy is picked on by another that is quite larger than he is. The teacher decides to put them together for a project in hopes that they will overcome their problem.

Once the bully sees the other boy’s home life is filled with arguments, much like his, he realizes that the boy is not any different. The two manage to become friends and decide to do their project on the effects of bullying.

The project shows that solutions can be found by listening to what the other person has to say. All it takes is for one person to stop talking and, as the song says, listen.

The students are in a class taught by Professor Jill Urban-Bollis.

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